There are some great moments in Ghost Recon: Wildlands but experiencing them requires some very specific conditions – namely that you and your friends take things seriously. It’s on the lighter, more actiony side of the tactical shooter spectrum, but its large scale means you really need to think about what you’re doing. Most missions involve carefully creeping about, tagging enemies, and then coordinating and executing an attack. Go in without a coherent strategy and you’ll get split up, the gunfire will come from all directions and chaos will stomp all over your finely tuned plan. 

The size of the spaces you have to control mean bigger camps, more distance to travel and lots more that can go wrong. Shooting the first person you see is a recipe for disaster – you’ll die because you panic when a ton of enemies appear rush in to see what happened. Or because you stop working as a team as you’re overwhelmed. Chaos is not your friend. Ever seen one of those scenes in a war movie when a soldier breaks down and curls up sobbing behind a wall as war happens all over the place? That’s you playing Ghost Recon Wildlands badly. 

However, with three people prepared to talk and give the same level of commitment, there’s some great moments here. The Bolivian setting is huge, with 11 different ecosystems like mountains, salt flats, snowy areas, swamps and more. There’s also around 100 missions open from the get go, with only some of the more final story stuff gated. The idea, says Ubisoft, is try and recreate that idea of what real spec ops people do – go behind enemy lines and improvise with whatever they can find. The structure of the drug cartel you’re trying to bring down is split across production, security, smuggling, and influence (think propaganda/press). Once you’re let loose you can start to strip these away to destabilise the organisation and, ultimately, bring it down however you see fit. The Bolivian setting is so big that, while any given objective is clear, getting there is a story you get to tell yourself. Spoiler: guns are involved.