A decommissioned Titan II intercontinental ballistic missile sits in an underground silo at the Titan Missile Museum in Sahuarita, Arizona.

This 25-ton blast door leads to a once-secret nuclear bunker built for members of Congress beneath The Greenbrier, a four-star resort near White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia.

This sign marks the spot of the former K-25 building, where uranium was enriched for America’s nuclear weapons in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

This control room for the X-10 graphite reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory will become part of the soon-to-be-established Manhattan Project National Historical Park.

The radioactive core of the F Reactor on the Hanford Site, one of nine nuclear reactors built to make plutonium for nuclear weapons, now sits cocooned in concrete on the banks of the Columbia River in Hanford, Washington.

The loading face of the X-10 graphite reactor, the world’s second reactor after Enrico Fermi’s so-called “Chicago Pile,” can be seen through the window of the control room at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.”

Western wheatgrass now grows around the former launch site of a Minuteman intercontinental ballistic missile outside Wall, South Dakota.

This is one of only two homes that remain from Doomtown, a fake American community that was destroyed by an atomic bomb test in 1955 at the Nevada National Security Site, 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas.

This pyramid-shaped anti-missile radar is part of the Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex outside of Nekoma, North Dakota.

This satellite calibration target outside Casa Grande, Arizona was used during the Cold War to help America’s Corona satellites focus their lenses before spying on the Soviet Union. At one time there were 272 of these 60-foot-wide crosses scattered throughout southern Arizona.

This underground cafeteria was meant to feed 535 lawmakers and their staff at the 113,000-square-foot nuclear bunker beneath The Greenbriar resort near White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia.

This decommissioned tower in the Appalachian Mountains, near Sylvan, Pennsylvania, was part of a network of nuclear-hardened microwave communications towers that would have been used for government communications in the wake of a nuclear attack.

This former U.S. Army munitions bunker near Edgemont, South Dakota, is one of 575 bunkers that have been repurposed by a private developer into a doomsday shelter for disaster preppers.

This room in the nuclear bunker beneath The Greenbriar resort near Sulphur Springs, West Virginia, would have served as the House of Representatives in the wake of a nuclear war.

This incinerator would have handled “pathological waste” at the nuclear bunker beneath The Greenbriar resort near White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia.

This is one of the two 23-ton blast doors that lead to the NORAD facility inside the Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station in Colorado Springs, Colorado.



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